Tag Archives: crime

A model is to an example as

Sports Role Models

The sports athelete is a tough job; especially if you are very good at what you do. With success, more money and more responsibilites come with the territory as money is tied to image, image is tied to sponsorship contracts, and public perception is easily sculpted from one’s glorified actions. Even more importantly though is how youth see’s sports figures – because it is the youth that idolizes these stars and will mimick their behavior. Thus, it is advantageous for these athletes to be socially responsible so that they become a role model as opposed to an ‘example of’. Role models are positive, are a good pattern to model youth’s behavior after (on & off the court/field); in contrast, an ‘example of’ character is one whose on & off the court behavior is frowned upon in society, and these individuals are usually known as the ‘bad boys’ and have run-ins with local and federal law enforcement (Vick!). Enough preamble, let’s get into it:

 

A model is to an example as …

Jerry Rice is to Michael Vick


Designed by: Mike Walchuk


Designed by: Sapoman

We all know the story of Michael Vick’s foolishness …


Michael Jordan is to Charles Barkley


Designed by: austin671


Designed by: evolutionsky

Probably not a pic from, but this must be the press conference where he explained that he had the get the killer brain from the girl in Phoenix …


Emmitt Smith is to Terrell Owens
Designed by: dzmond


Designed by: kelmo


Muhammad Ali is to Mike Tyson


Designed by: el-douglas


Designed by: ucarts

Mike Tyson has went from being a ruthless boxer to now showing some warmth, his latest movie I hear is actually pretty good.
.:: LiBM ::.

The Wire, a synopsis of an American story

From Hbo.com:

The Wire show creator David Simon imparts his final words about the series

David Simon

It wasn’t for everyone. We proved that rather quickly. 

But episode to episode, you began to understand that we were committed to creating something careful and ornate, something that might resonate. You took Lester Freamon at his word: That we were building something here and all the pieces matter.

When we took a chainsaw to the first season, choosing to begin the second-story arc with an entirely different theme and different characters, you followed us to the port and our elegy for America’s working class. When we shifted again, taking up the political culture of our mythical city in season three, you remained loyal. And when we ended the Barksdale arc and began an exploration of public education, you were, by that time, we hope, elated to understand that whatever else might happen, The Wire would not waste your time telling the same story twice.

This year, our drama asked its last thematic question: Why, if there is any truth to anything presented in The Wire over the last four seasons, does that truth go unaddressed by our political culture, by most of our mass media, and by our society in general? 

We’ve given our answer:

We are a culture without the will to seriously examine our own problems. We eschew that which is complex, contradictory or confusing. As a culture, we seek simple solutions. We enjoy being provoked and titillated, but resist the rigorous, painstaking examination of issues that might, in the end, bring us to the point of recognizing our problems, which is the essential first step to solving any of them.

The Wire is fiction. Many of the events depicted over the last five seasons did not, to our knowledge, happen. Fewer happened in the exact manner described. Fiction is fiction, and it should in no way be confused with journalism.

But it is also fair to note that the problems themselves — politicians cooking crime stats for higher office, school administrators teaching test questions to vindicate No Child Left Behind, sensitive prosecutions and investigations being undercut for political motives, brutal drug wars fought amid a police department’s ignorance of and indifference to the forces involved — were indeed problems in the recent history of the actual Baltimore, Maryland.

Few of these matters received the serious attention — or, in some cases — any attention from the media. These problems exist in plain sight, ready to be addressed by anyone seriously committed to doing so. For those of us writing The Wire, a television drama, story research involved dragging the right police lieutenants or school teachers, prosecutors and political functionaries to neighborhood diners and bars and taking story notes down on cocktail napkins and paper placemats. To be more precise with their tales? To record it and relay it in a manner that can stand as non-fiction truthtelling? Yes, that’s harder to do. But there was a time when journalism regarded that kind of coverage as its highest mission. The true stories that The Wire traded in are out there, waiting for anyone willing to take the time. And it is, of course, vaguely disturbing to us that our unlikely little television drama is making arguments that were once the prerogative of more serious mediums.

We tried to be entertaining, but in no way did we want to be mistaken for entertainment. We tried to provoke, to critique and debate and rant a bit. We wanted an argument. We think a few good arguments are needed still, that there is much more to be said and it is entirely likely that there are better ideas than the ones we offered. But nothing happens unless the shit is stirred. That, for us, was job one.

If you followed us for sixty hours, and you find yourself caring about these issues more than you thought you would, then perhaps the next step is to engage and to demand, where possible, a more sophisticated and meaningful response from authority when it comes to such things as the drug war, educational reform or responsible political leadership. The Wire is about the America we pay for and tolerate. Perhaps it is possible to pay for, and demand, something more.

Again, accept our sincere thanks for making the commitment to watch a show as improbable and problematic as ours and for considering the arguments and issues seriously. We are surprised as you are to be here at the end, on our own terms, still standing. As a cast and crew, we’re proud. But the credit is not all ours. It’s yours as well for believing, year after year, in this story.

David Simon
Baltimore, Md.
March 10, 2008

.:: d.b

Life in B Major
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Street Land Savvy

Organized Street Crime

“Almost 100 people — including 69 men, 21 women and five people under 18 — are appearing in court today to face charges ranging from possesssion of stolen property to drug and gun trafficking and gangsterism charges after yesterday morning’s raids targeting members of the west-end Toronto street gang Driftwood Crips.

In total, 88 search warrants were executed on residences, vehicles and lockers. Warrants are still outstanding for nine people.

Hundreds of police officers executed 37 search warrants in the Jane and Finch area — the epicentre of Project Kryptic, so named for sounding a little like Crips. The Driftwood Crips were the main target of the investigation that began almost a year ago.

After spending the night in custody, the suspects are being paraded into Etobicoke court where they will be identified and their fate determined so far as bail is concerned.

As part of Project Kryptic, which began 11 months ago, police seized 24 handguns, four sawed-off rifles, four replica guns and 900 rounds of ammunition.

Police also seized 30 kilograms of cocaine, 20 kilograms of marijuana, hash oil and close to a quarter of a million dollars in Canadian and U.S. currency”


My commentary on this event in Toronto is that every year or so, the police announces a big raid/bust that dismantles a street gang — which is good for the community and city. Most street gangs have two elements: white-collar crime & violence. White-collar crime in the form of money laundering and transnational schemes/hustles. Violence can be defined as confrontations between rival gangs vying for street superiority. I understand that the media pays toooo much attention to violent acts. White-collar crime is more costly and harmful not only to the direct parties involved, but to regional/national economies and markets. White-collar crime is committed by organizations that are kinda above the ‘street gang’ label – but police do not seemed to be so determined to catch/raid these organizations as much as the street gangs. When was the last time the mafia was raided with such a big sting? Is it because they are more sophisticated than street gangs or is more attention/resources put towards street gangs??

Just my two cents …

Peace