Tag Archives: agriculture

Peri-Urban Farming

Urban Farmers

Sustaining urban agriculture

If ‘green’ is the new ‘black’ (don’t know what the new ‘black’ really was), then part of the green initiative that may actually do some real good is the phenomenon known as Urban Farming or Urban agricultures – which is the practice of cultivating, processing and distributing food in, or around (peri-urban), a village, town or city. In North American cities, these practice has picked up steam in the past 10 years as you can go to many dense populated areas to find portioned areas (that have a bit of grass) with all sorts of vegetables and fruits. With some of the following stats compiled by the U.N., it is clear why the practice of urban agriculture is growing:

* 50% of the world’s population lives in cities.
* 800 million people are involved in urban agriculture world-wide and contribute to feeding urban residents.
 * Low income urban dwellers spend between 40% and 60% of their income on food each year.
* By 2015 about 26 cities in the world are expected to have a population of 10 million or more. To feed a city of this size – at least 6000 tonnes of food must be imported each day.

Urban farming is generally practiced for income-earning or food-producing activities though in some communities the main impetus is recreation and relaxation. Urban agriculture contributes to food security and food safety in two ways: first, it increases the amount of food available to people living in cities, and, second, it allows fresh vegetables and fruits and meat products to be made available to urban consumers. A common and efficient form of urban agriculture is the biointensive method. Because urban agriculture promotes energy-saving local food production, urban and peri-urban agriculture are generally seen as sustainable practices.

Cuban Urban Farming

 

Pacific Rim Farming

Chicago Urban Farm

New York City Urban Farming

Not only will you be saving money from shopping for produce, but you will be helping produce oxygen into the air as most of these urban cities are smog infested.  This is a ‘green’ movement that I can ‘see’

 

.:: LiBM ::.

King Corn

 

King Corn
Corn and America’s Obsession

KING CORN tells the story of two friends, one acre of corn, and the subsidized crop that drives our fast-food nation. As the film unfolds, Ian Cheney and Curt Ellis, best friends from college on the east coast, moveto the heartland to learn where their food comes from. With the help offriendly neighbors, genetically modified seeds, and powerful herbicides, they plant and grow a bumper crop of America’s most-productive, most-ubiquitous grain on one acre of Iowa soil. But when they try to followtheir pile of corn into the food system, what they questions about how we eat—and how we farm. 

Here is an excerpt of the producers of King Corn on CNN:
Popular foods and non-foods that contain corn:
Foods Containing Corn
Alcohol
Ale/Beer
Bacon
Baking Mixes
Baking Powders
Batters for frying
Beverages (sweetened)
Bleached White Flour
Breads & Pastries
Cakes
Catsup
Cookies
Corn Flakes
Cream Pies
Fritos
Frostings
Fruit (canned)
Fruit Drinks
Gelatin Desserts
Graham Crackers
Gravies
Grits
Gum
Hominy Grits
Ice Cream
Jams
Jellies
Infant Formula
Margarine
Meats (bologna, sausage)
Oleo
Peanut Butter
Popcorn
Powdered Sugar
Preserves
Puddings
Salas Dressings
Soups Soybean Milks
Syrups
Tortillas
Vinegar, Distilled
Wine
Ingredients that may indicate presence of corn:
Dextrose
Hydrolyzed Protein
Maltose
Maltodextrin
Modified Food Starch
Non Food Products Containing Corn:
Aspirin
Cough Syrups
Envelopes
Gelatin Capsules
Powders
Stamps
Starched Clothing
Talcums
Toothpaste
Vitamins

Knowledge is power people – recognize what foods you are eating and what is in it.  
Check out more about King Corn at: http://www.kingcorn.net
.:: d.b::.